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Ric Dolphin is president of Dolphin Media, Inc. and the editor and publisher of Insight into Government, a weekly newsletter available by subscription. He reports on Alberta political affairs from the Alberta Legislature in Edmonton, AB, Canada.

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Upcoming

  • Jun 24 CENTRE OR BUST
    Centrists including disaffected Tories, Alberta Party members, and renegade Liberals will gather in Red Deer to discuss the invigoration of the Alberta Party into a viable political force for 2019 (see story to the left). The meeting will be held at the Black Knight Inn from 11 am to 3 pm. Tickets are $25 and include lunch. For more info: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lets-bring-alberta-together-tickets-34840404588

This Week's Get a free sample

Week ending June 16th, 2017 Vol 31, No 37

AP ED — Katherine O'Neill, until recently president of the Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta, was this week appointed executive director of Alberta Together, the Stephen Mandel-organized political action committee that wants to turn the Alberta Party into the next Lougheed Tories.
Canada was built on dead beavers
Margaret Atwood

Inside this week

Guess what? The indiginees don't like the child welfare system.
The feud between the Wildrose leader and the party prez does some political damage
McMurray response gets a passing grade

Top Story

Not so long ago, it was called “the Indian problem,”and although white guilt and liberal gentility has evolved semanticallyto the point where new locutions are required annuallyto describe Canada’s original settlers —last year, “Aboriginals;” this year “Indigenous Peoples” —the “problem” remains: namely how toreduce the poverty, crime, addiction, child abuse and neglect, school drop-out-rates, incarceration, adolescent suicides, and general desperation that all exist at disproportionately high levels among both registered and non-registered Indians (still the legal term), half of whom live on reserves, half in cities and towns.

And while these deplorable conditions affect only perhaps 30% of the indigenous and Métis population, they are source of the disproportionately high rate of native children who are removed from theirfamilies by Alberta’s child intervention services and placed in foster homes, kinship care, or group homes. Sixty-nine percent of all Alberta children in care are Aboriginal, Métis, or Inuit. This imbalance is by no means unique to Alberta (see chart, p. 2), and through the years all of the provinces have conducted studies and enquiries into the causes and possible solutions for the situation — studies usually prompted by the high profile death of an indigenous child in care—with limited success.Alberta’s latest examination of its child welfare system, like several others that have occurred in the last two decades, was prompted by a…

Political Pulse

Internecine skirmishing and threats of hostile political interference from the enemy camp marked this week’s travails in the conservative unity campaign.

The skirmishing began on Monday when Wildrose President Jeff Callaway accused party leader Brian Jean of jeopardizing the chancesof a yes vote on unity by putting his own interests ahead of those of the movement.

Callaway, a Calgary investment advisor, hasbeen involved with the Wildrose since the party’sinception, but he has always claimed to bemore interested in…